“Amazon’s push into trying to create a unique new retail experience may persuade other traditional retailers to begin organizing their products in a similar fashion, showing consumers what other consumers are attracted to, purchasing and yearning for—versus what the brand is trying to sell through their weekly sales flyer.”

Amazon has done it again—they’ve found another way to change up the shopping experience.

In case you haven’t heard, Amazon’s recently launched retail location, Amazon 4-Star, sells only items that get great reviews as well as leveraging some of their own first party data to drive specials and some unique selling opportunities. From being able to tangibly see what consumers have on their wish lists the most, to a table full of what is hot in the New York area right now, Amazon’s new experience is creating more than a shopping experience—it’s creating a tangible web experience in-person.

For years, retailers have been trying to figure out how to emulate the best parts of the digital shopping experience in-store and struggling to find a way to make it meaningful. As consumers continue to float seamlessly between online and offline shopping experiences, they’re leveraging brick-and-mortar locations as a way to “get a feel” for a product they plan on ordering online. Of course, this doesn’t mean they’re actually making the purchase if they like the item in question while they’re in-store—they’re probably standing there looking on their phones to find where they can get it cheaper.

While retailers can’t solve the riddle of price competition for online vs. offline shopping, Amazon’s new concept does prove that the store can use its own data, reviews and logistics platforms to enhance the shopping experience. Having readily available consumer reviews, organizing items by what consumers want the most, featuring essential goods in a separate section, and more are a few of the perks that currently exist in online shopping—and would greatly benefit a majority of retail stores.

Amazon’s push into trying to create a unique new retail experience may persuade other traditional retailers to begin organizing their products in a similar fashion, showing consumers what other consumers are attracted to, purchasing and yearning for—versus what the brand is trying to sell through their weekly sales flyer. This new retail organization format may begin to bring a unique experience into retail destinations that we have exclusively seen online—and often taken for granted.

Being able to physically browse an aisle of “things you didn’t know you needed” is something I’m much more inclined to do instead of mindlessly clicking my way through. Imagine if stores began taking some of their digital shelf space organization and applying it to their retail locations—it means retail environments get a step closer to becoming a tangible, living eCommerce experience.

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