Gaming Noir

For years Hollywood has pushed the black and white crime dramas, filled with enough sexual emphasis and plot twists to satisfy a paperback romance novel, but with this form of entertainment being so well accepted, why hasn’t it crossed over?

Recently, gaming blog Kotaku posted an edited trailer to the upcoming L.A. Noire game in black and white. This sparked a lot of thinking, is it time for black and white gaming? And if so, why hasn’t this happened yet? It would make a seedy 1920’s era atmosphere a lot more believeable. And I also think it would fit right into our current obsession with nostalgia.

However, nostalgia alone isn’t the only driver here, something else is coming along that I’ve been calling the double homage, a tribute within a tribute. This idea of double homage has been floating around the Netherlands in the form of 1920’s Dub Step. Essentially taking music from the 1920’s and adding in a modern speed and bass line.

A lot of it plays into the best of Dub from the end of the 90’s, as well as the best big band performances of the 1920’s; once again a double homage. So with this mindset, why haven’t see seen a game that looks like the rest of the entertainment of the era, black and white. It makes sense to relate the two, seeing how accepting we are of it on the big screen.

Locke Hilderbrand

Locke has grown up with an eclectic mix of travel and technology at all times. His views and ideas are inspired by the fusion of subcultures and street scenes, global travel and the internet. He is a cultural translator and scene adaptor by day, artist by night, always hunting for what's next and embracing what's now

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